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Germanwings Flight 9525

Germanwings Flight 9525 was a scheduled international passenger flight flying from Barcelona, Spain to Dusseldorf, Germany, operated by the Lufthansa-owned low-cost airline Germanwings. On 24 March 2015, the Airbus A320-200 jetliner crashed aroun ...

Gestapo

The Gestapo was the official secret police of Nazi Germany. Hermann Goring, the Minister-President of Prussia, formed the unit in 1933. Beginning on 20 April 1934, it was under the administration of SS national leader Heinrich Himmler, who in 193 ...

Gladiator

Gladiators were professional fighters in ancient Rome, who fought against each other, wild animals and sentenced criminals, sometimes to the death, for the entertainment of the public. These fights took place in arenas in many cities from the Rom ...

Globe Theatre

The Globe Theatre was a theatre in London where Shakespeares plays were held. It was built in 1599 by Shakespeares company, the Lord Chamberlains Men. Over the years, several theatres have held this name, all in central London. The Globe could se ...

Shooting of Robert Godwin

On April 16, 2017, Robert Godwin, Sr., a 74-year-old retired foundry worker, was shot and killed while walking on a sidewalk in a neighborhood in Cleveland, Ohio. The suspect was 37-year-old Steve William Stephens. Stephens posted a video of the ...

Golden age

Golden age is an expression that people use when they are talking or writing about a time that is past, when everything seemed to be good. There are several ways that the term can be used. It can be used for an historic period in a particular pla ...

Golden Age of India

The period between the 4th century and 6th century AD is known as the Golden Age of India because of the large achievements Indians made in the fields of mathematics, astronomy, sculpting and painting during the Gupta Empire. Significant contribu ...

Goths

Goth can also stand for a member of the Goth subculture The Goths were an East Germanic tribe. They spoke the Gothic language. Jordanes was a scholar from the 6th century who wrote a summary of a twelve volume work by Cassiodorus about the Goths. ...

Grand Cross

The phrase Grand Cross is used to describe the highest grade in many types of knighthood. Sometimes the person with the highest grade are called "knights grand cross" or just "grand crosses". Sometimes the actual medallion or ribbon is called "th ...

Grand Duchy of Tuscany

The Grand Duchy of Tuscany was a monarchy in Tuscany, an area in the north-west of the Italian Peninsula. It existed, with interruptions, from 1569 to 1859. It replaced the Duchy of Florence. It was ruled by the Grand Duke of Tuscany. The capital ...

2019 Grays incident

In the early hours of 23 October 2019, 39 dead bodies were found in a freight container in Grays, Essex, England. The lorry cab is owned by an Irish company. It had been registered Bulgaria, but had not been there since 2017. It travelled from th ...

Great Central Fair

The Great Central Fair was a fair that happened in June 1864. It took place in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. It was held to raise funds for the United States Sanitary Commission.

Great Fire of New York (1776)

The Great Fire of New York was a large fire in New York City. It burned through the night of September 21, 1776 on the west side of the former boundaries of New York City at the southern end of the island of Manhattan. It started when the British ...

Great Migration (African American)

The Great Migration was the migration of around 6 million African Americans out of the Southern United States to the Midwest, Northeast and West. The main reasons African Americans left the south were to escape racism and seek jobs in industrial ...

Great Northern War

The Great Northern War, was a war fought between Sweden and the coalition of Russia, Saxony, Poland, and Denmark-Norway. In 1715 Prussia and Hannover joined the war against Sweden. The King of Hannover was also King George II of Great Britain. Af ...

Great Pyramid of Giza

The Great Pyramid of Giza of Egypt is a huge pyramid built by the Ancient Egyptians. It stands 18.4 km from Cairo, Egypt. It is the oldest of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World, and the only one to remain mostly intact. When it was built it w ...

Great Recession

The Great Recession was a global economic decline in the late 2000s to early 2010s decade. The effects of the economic problem are still obvious. A few countries, including Italy and Greece, are still in recession. The Great Recession affected wo ...

Great Stink

The Great Stink was in central London in July and August 1858. During hot weather the smell of untreated faeces was overpowering. It was caused by untreated human waste in the River Thames, and on its banks. An ageing and inadequate sewer system ...

Greco-Bactrian Kingdom

The Greco-Bactrian Kingdom was the eastern-most tip of the Ancient Greek world. It lasted between 250-125BC. It covered Afghanistan but also bits of Turkmenistan, Iran, and Pakistan. It covered a region originally conquered by Alexander the Great.

Greek underworld

The underworld is the place in Greek mythology where people go when they die. The underworld is controlled by Hades, one of the three main gods. The underworlds gates are guarded by the three-headed dog, Cerberus. The underworld was surrounded by ...

Greek War of Independence

The Greek War of Independence, also commonly known as the Greek Revolution, was a successful war by the Greeks who won independence for Greece from the Ottoman Empire. Muhammad Ali Pasha sent his son Ismail with an army and a fleet to help fight ...

Gulf War

The Persian Gulf War, sometimes just called the Gulf War, was a conflict between Iraq and 34 other countries, led by the United States. It started with the invasion of Kuwait by Iraq on August 2, 1990. Iraq had long claimed Kuwait as part of its ...

Gymnasium (ancient Greece)

In Ancient Greece the Gymnasion was a place where athletes could train for the competitions in public games, such as the Olympic Games. Gymnos means naked. Only men were allowed to enter, and train; they did so fully naked. Athletes also competed ...

Habsburg Spain

Habsburg Spain means the history of Spain over the 16th and 17th centuries. This was when Spain was ruled by the major branch of the Habsburg dynasty. Under Habsburg rule, Spain reached the height of its influence and power. The Hapsburgs had lan ...

Haitian Revolution

The Haitian Revolution was a conflict in the French colony of Saint-Domingue, leading to the abolition of slavery in Haiti and the formation of Haiti as the first modern republic ruled by Africans. It was the biggest slave rebellion since the Zan ...

Hammadid dynasty

The Hammadids were a Berber group. It was in what is now north-eastern modern Algeria. It existed from about 1008 to 1152. They were destroyed by the Almohads. The capital was first Qalaat Beni Hammad. It is now a UNESCO World Heritage Site. In 1 ...

Hasmonean dynasty

The Hasmonean dynasty was a family that led the Hasmoneans led the Maccabean Revolt and transformed Judah from a Seleucid possession that was becoming more Greek-like into an independent, Jewish nation-state. The Hasmoneans expanded Judah through ...

Hattusili III

Hattusili III was a king of the Hittite empire around 1267–1237 BC. He was the fourth and last son of Mursili II. Hattusili led the Hittite forces in the Battle of Kadesh against Egypt in 1274 BC. Hattusili and the Egyptian pharaoh Ramesses II la ...

Haymarket affair

The Haymarket affair was the aftermath of a bombing that took place at a labor protest on May 4, 1886, at Haymarket Square in Chicago. It began as a peaceful rally in support of workers striking for an eight-hour day and in reaction to the killin ...

Hellenistic period

The Hellenistic period in Ancient Greece was the time period between the death of Alexander the Great when the generals of Alexander created their own empires and the Roman conquest of mainland Greece. During this era: Greek culture, art and powe ...

Heraia

The Heraia were footraces held in honor of the goddess Hera in Olympia, Greece since early ancient times. The races were said to have been created by Hippodameia in gratitude for her marriage to Pelops. Only virgins from Elis, Greece competed. Th ...

Herakles

Herakles is a divine hero in Greek mythology. The greatest of the Greek heroes, Herakles was a demigod, son of Zeus and the mortal Alkmene as well as the twin brother of Iphicles. As a god, Herakles served as a paragon of masculinity, and was a p ...

Heraldry

Heraldry is the art and science of designing and using a coat of arms. The study of coats of arms is also called armory. The practice of using distinct markings on a persons shield started in the Middle Ages, when a knights helmet covered his fac ...

Herero and Namaqua genocide

The Herero and Namaqua Genocide is thought to have been the first genocide of the 20th century. It took place between 1904 and 1907 in German South-West Africa, during the scramble for Africa. On January 12, 1904, the Herero people, led by Samuel ...

Heritage of Mercury. Almaden and Idrija

Heritage of Mercury. Almaden and Idrija is a joint UNESCO World Heritage site in Almaden, Spain, and Idrija, Slovenia. The property includes two mercury mining sites. In Almaden mercury has been extracted since antiquity, while in Idrija it was f ...

Hermes and the Infant Dionysos

Hermes and the Infant Dionysos is a statue possibly made by the ancient Greek sculptor Praxiteles. The statue was discovered in 1877 in the ruins of the Temple of Hera at Olympia, Greece. It is now in the Archaeological Museum of Olympia. The sta ...

Reinhard Heydrich

Reinhard Tristan Eugen Heydrich was a high-ranking Nazi officer in World War II. In 1922 he joined the Kriegsmarine, the German Navy. In 1931 he was expelled and got a job with the Nazis. Heydrich became German SS-Obergruppenfuhrer General of the ...

Hide (unit)

The hide was a unit of land measurement. Everywhere in Anglo-Saxon England except Kent it was the land held by a peasant and his family. Originally it was the amount of land necessary to support one household. The amount of land that made up one ...

Highwayman

A highwayman was a type of robber who attacked people who were travelling. They were common in the British Isles from the time of Elizabeth I to the 1800s. Highwaymen rode on horses. They were thought to be socially superior to footpads. Some hig ...

Hillsborough disaster

The Hillsborough disaster was an incident that happened on 15 April 1989. It happened at the Hillsborough Stadium in Sheffield, South Yorkshire, England. A stampede of people in the stadiums caused the deaths of 96 people. Another 766 people were ...

Hinterkaifeck murders

Hinterkaifeck was a small farmstead near the Bavarian towns of Ingolstadt and Schrobenhausen. It was about 70 kilometres north of Munich. On the evening of 31 March 1922, the six people who lived in the farm were killed. The murders remain unsolv ...

Historikerstreit

The Historikerstreit was an intellectual and political controversy in West Germany about the way the Holocaust should be interpreted in history. It took place between 1986-1989, and pitted left-wing intellectuals against right-wing intellectuals. ...

History of Florida

The history of Florida began when the first Native Americans came to live in the peninsula about 14.000 years ago. They left behind artifacts and archeological evidence. Written history begins with the arrival of Europeans to Florida. In 1513, th ...

Hitler Youth

The Hitler Youth was an organization in Nazi Germany for children from ages 10 to 18. The girls split off from the Hitler Youth when they were 14 to join The League of German Maidens. All German children between these ages whom Adolf Hitler consi ...

Holocaust denial

Holocaust denial is the claim that the Holocaust did not happen, or was not as bad as most people think it was. Historians agree that during World War II, the Nazis did kill millions of people during the Holocaust, including many people in concen ...

Holy Roman Emperor

Holy Roman Emperor was the title that was given to the ruler of a loose group of places in mostly Central Europe called the Holy Roman Empire. The title of "emperor" was passed from the Romans to the Frankish kingdom when, on 25 December 800, Pop ...

2019–20 Hong Kong protests

The 2019-20 Hong Kong anti-extradition bill protests were caused by the Fugitive Offenders and Mutual Legal Assistance in Criminal Matters Legislation Bill 2019 proposed by the Government of Hong Kong. Many protests were held in Hong Kong and oth ...

Hooverville

A "Hooverville" is the popular name for slum towns built by people without homes during the Great Depression. They were named after Herbert Hoover, who was the President of the United States during the start of the Great Depression and was given ...

Horses in World War I

Horses in World War I were very easily killed by machine guns and ordinary guns on the battlefields. Over 48.000 horses were killed in World War I, 210 from poison gas. Many drowned, died of exhaustion, or got stuck in mud or shell holes. Horses ...

Hotaki dynasty

The Hotaki dynasty was founded in 1709 by Mirwais Hotak at Kandahar, Afghanistan. It was made up of Pashtuns who belonged to the Hotak tribe of Pashtuns. They revolted and made their land independent from foreign ruler, but later they invaded Per ...

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Pino - logical board game which is based on tactics and strategy. In general this is a remix of chess, checkers and corners. The game develops imagination, concentration, teaches how to solve tasks, plan their own actions and of course to think logically. It does not matter how much pieces you have, the main thing is how they are placement!

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